editorial.1.31.18


In his first State of the Union Address Tuesday night, we witnessed a seemingly different President Trump.

For one hour and 20 minutes, we saw a soft-spoken Donald Trump, who spoke slowly and clearly calling for unity.

There were no usual divisive and insulting-rhetoric.

Not a single mention of his oft-repeated word “fake.”

A Washington Post columnist commented, “It wasn’t strident; it wasn’t provocative; it wasn’t alienating; it wasn’t retributive...”

It sounded encouraging with positive benchmarks: economic progress, surging markets (despite Tuesday’s negative results), and greater business confidence.

He invited modern-day American heroes, including a Filipino-American agent with Homeland Security, and presented them one by one to the American people citing and thanking their heroic acts.

“We all share the same home, the same heart, the same destiny and the same great American flag,” the President said.

He also appealed for bipartisanship, saying, “So tonight, I am extending an open hand to work with members of both parties — Democrats and Republicans — to protect our citizens of every background, color, religion and creed...because Americans are dreamers too.”

The President called for a bipartisan immigration plan with four elements or pillars:

a) path to citizenship for DACA dreamers and others with a waiting period of 12 years;

b) border security including a wall;

c) ending chain migration; and

d) ending the visa lottery system.

The chief executive also proposed a bipartisan infrastructure program that would cost both the public and private sectors $1.5 trillion.

Critics of the President hope that Mr. Trump will do as he “preached,” especially his call for unity because he has done the opposite in the past 12 months.

A mainstream opinion-maker wrote the morning after that the speech was good, but, at the same time, she opined, “None of these tidings erase the errors of Trump’s first year in office, or the negative effects of his often mean-spirited rhetoric. Nor does it alter the realities of the ongoing Russia investigation, the likely-to-be released memo by the House Intelligence Committee or the administration’s general dysfunction.”

Add comment


Security code
Refresh

Latest comments