Potpourri

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AS we get older, we become more vulnerable to injuries, in part because we are less agile than we used to be, and we have also lost some of our former bone and muscle mass, says the October 2013 issue of the Harvard Medical School’s Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

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ALTHOUGH for many of us, driving is a vital component of freedom and independence, aging brings physical changes that can jeopardize a future on the road - don’t ignore signs that you’re struggling at the wheel; a quick fix may be all that’s necessary, says the September 2013 issue of the Harvard Health Letter.

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WHILE you have so many important numbers to remember, such as your bank account PIN and your alarm system code, there are numbers which may be less familiar that you learn when you see your doctor for a routine physical and blood tests - your waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides and blood sugar - which you need to know, because they provide important clues to your heart health, says the September issue of the Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

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ONE in every three adults age 65 and older falls each year, and falls are the leading cause of injury and death in this age group, as well as the most common cause of nonfatal and hospital admissions for trauma - these injuries can make it hard to get around or live independently, and also may increase the risk of early death, says the September 2013 issue of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s Focus on Healthy Aging.

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OUR concept of aging has changed: Instead of worrying about how long we will live, (our life span), we now understand that how long we can live a healthy life - the concept of “health span” - may be more important, says the August 2013 of the Harvard Medical School’s Harvard Health Letter.

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